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Posts Tagged ‘Tate Modern’

Blink Inspiration: Vice Style Visionaries Part 3- Nick Knight

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

This is the third, and we think very possibly the most exciting of the Vice Style/ Blackberry ‘Visionaries’ series. We hope that you enjoyed our posts on Gareth Pugh and Diane Pernet from this series too.

Nick Knight is among the world’s most influential photographers as well as being Director & founder of SHOWstudio.com the fashion & art internet broadcasting channel.  He has won numerous awards for his editorial work for Vogue, Dazed & Confused, W magazine, i-D, and Visionaire, as well as for fashion and advertising projects for clients including Christian Dior, Alexander McQueen, Calvin Klein, Levi Strauss, Yohji Yamamoto and Yves Saint Laurent.

As a fashion photographer, Nick Knight has consistently challenged conventional notions of beauty.  His first book of photographs, skinheads, was published in 1982.  He has since produced Nicknight, a 12 year retrospective, and Flora, a series of flower pictures.  Knight’s work has been exhibited at such institutions as the Victoria & Albert Museum, Saatchi Gallery, the Photographers Gallery and Hayward Gallery and recently The Tate Modern.  He has produced a permanent installation, Plant Power, for the Natural History Museum in London.

In the video Knight speaks incredibly inspirationally and eloquently about fashion as an art form and the creative force that is Lady Gaga, as well as the current evolution/ revolution occurring within the way the fashion industry is communication and operating. Knight also talks about his respect for and working relationship with the Fashion Director at SHOWstudio, Alex Fury. Knight and Fury have been instrumental in changing the way that fashion is being communicated, particularly through the instantaneous reportage that they produce from the shows, featured on the SHOWstudio site.

Blink Events: The Art of Dance

Thursday, September 2nd, 2010

On Sunday I enjoyed my favorite London walk from Somerset House to the Tate Modern. If you ever feel tired of London, its a sure fire way to fall back in love with this amazing city.

We arrived at the Tate in time to have a random wonder around the galleries and then head down to the Turbine Hall in readiness to catch the Michael Clarke choreographed dance installation. I’d read about this in the week’s edition of le Cool (if you don’t subscribe already then do it now!) and had been really looking forward to it. Not only is Clark a long term favorite of “Blink”, but I was also really interested in the concept of this ‘installation’.

Michael Clark and his company have been working in the Turbine Hall for the past seven weeks, making the development and rehearsal stages of this piece visible to all. This piece incorporates some of the company’s immensely skilled dancers along with 75 untrained members of the public. During the performance, the division seemed purposefully clear between ballerina and non-ballerina with a difference in costume (the non-dancers in black) as well as Clark cleverly using the dancers in different ways. This created a really great energy as well as a stunning visual spectacle.

The space is immense, but the pumping Bowie soundtrack and the dashing and surging dancers really worked the space brilliantly. The graphic, monochrome floor complimented the linear and sharp shapes in the piece. The only downside was that I wanted to be one of the special 75, not one of the spectators- but maybe next time! This was ‘Part 1’ of Clark and company’s residency and there will be a ‘Part 2’ of the project in June ’11. So, all that’s left to ask is where do I put my name down for it?

Michael Clark's dance intallation at the Tate Modern

Michael Clark's dance intallation at the Tate Modern

Michael Clark's dance intallation at the Tate Modern

Michael Clark's dance intallation at the Tate Modern

Click here for more “Blink” events.

Blink Arts- Pop Life

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

We had a delightful visit to the Tate Modern last week. We’d been looking for a window in our diary for a visit to the ‘Pop Life’ exhibition and the late night opening on Fridays and Saturdays provided the perfect opportunity- and a good excuse to have a glass of vino in the members bar followed by dinner in Borough Market!

The biggest draw in this exhibition for us was the recreation of Keith Haring’s New York ‘Pop Shop’. As a teen Haring and his radiant babies came to our attention, mainly due to our fabulous big brother (thanks Sky!), and made a huge stylistic impact. The recreation at the Tate Modern did not disappoint. The whole exhibition has a huge energy and excitement about it. There’s great work from Warhol, including brilliant wallpaper. Another “Blink” favorite, Jeff Koon’s ‘Rabbit’, is there too- and it’s surprisingly small. There’s also a room dedicated to the work of Takashi Murakami, who’s style you may recognize from his hook up with Louis Vuitton.

There is a section that’s dedicated to a porn star from the 70’s. We have no idea how or why it/ she is ‘Pop Art’. Any insights on this for us?

Murakami's 'Geisha'

Murakami's 'Geisha'

Koon's 'Rabbit'

Koon's 'Rabbit'

Gilly in the Keith Haring 'Pop Shop'

Gilly in the Keith Haring 'Pop Shop'

Warhol wallpaper

Warhol wallpaper

Blink Social- Dead Good

Monday, November 2nd, 2009

This past week we’ve enjoyed a couple of brilliant nights out celebrating Halloween in various ways. It’s been a fashion fest of ghoulish good looks and gruesome graphics. Its all perfect with the romantically dark Goth mood that’s out there right now.

Firstly, on Wednesday we headed up to the Proud Galleries in Camden for our pal, Russ’ birthday. He was DJing at their ‘Mexican Day of the Dead’ themed party. We boogied amongst a crowd of skeletons, zombies and vampires. It was a great night at a very cool venue.

Next came our trip to the Tate Modern. We went along for the late night opening on Saturday night. We’d planned to see the Pop Life exhibition (blog post on that soon), and were given an extra treat with the horror themed Tate Take Over event, featuring spooky art installations and live bands.

Click here for more on the events that we’ve posted about.

Click here for more on ‘Graphics’.

Proud, Camden

Proud, Camden

Proud, Camden

Proud, Camden

Proud, Camden

Proud, Camden

Proud, Camden

Proud, Camden

Tate Modern

Tate Modern

Tate Modern

Tate Modern